Pauline Hanson Tax Cuts Press Conference

You might have heard that One Nation will not be supporting the Government's corporate tax cuts. After speaking with my fellow One Nation Senators and reflecting on the Turnbull Government's budget, It was decided that I cannot, in good conscience, support their corperate tax cut policy because they have done absolutely nothing to address my concerns about immigration rates, support for pensioners, changes to the Petroleum Rent Resource Tax and how we collect royalties from multinationals ripping the guts out of the country, the cost of electricity, support for apprenticeships and holding the banks to account.If you would like to know more about why One Nation has reached this decision I covered this in great detail during an extensive media conference today. You can also read more about this here:https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/treasury/pauline-hanson-sinks-turnbulls-company-tax-plan/news-story/d55330c4a7c0b59cd06be9b90e34af22

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Monday, May 21, 2018

Company Tax Cuts: The Truth Behind Pauline’s Decision

You might have heard that One Nation will not be supporting the Government’s corporate tax cuts. After speaking with my fellow One Nation Senators and reflecting on the Turnbull Government’s budget, It was decided that I cannot, in good conscience, support their corperate tax cut policy.

They have done absolutely nothing to address my concerns about immigration rates, support for pensioners, changes to the Petroleum Rent Resource Tax and how we collect royalties from multinationals ripping the guts out of the country, the cost of electricity, support for apprenticeships and holding the banks to account.

If you would like to know more about why One Nation has reached this decision I covered this in great detail during an extensive media conference.

Pauline Hanson backs away from Company Tax Cuts

The media yesterday started saying i was waivering with these Company Tax Cuts. Well I'm not! I've made my decision to not support them any further than the $50 million turnover that has already passed.As much as people in big business would like a company tax cut, we need to rein in our national debt.No one begrudges a business owner making money. No different to employees who work hard to earn good money.We need a strong economy now – not in 8 years.I'd love nothing more than for power prices to drop by 20% to 30% to start with. I know Queensland can do it overnight if the Queensland Government didn't take a dividend from the power companies that are owned by the state government.The only way we'll save businesses and jobs in this country is if we bring down power prices immediately. This will go a long way in saving and creating Australian jobs.It's time we demand cheaper power prices from our State and Federal Governments.#Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Thursday, May 24, 2018

The media yesterday started saying I was waivering with these Company Tax Cuts. Well I’m not! I’ve made my decision to not support them any further than the $50 million turnover that has already passed.

As much as people in big business would like a company tax cut, we need to rein in our national debt.

No one begrudges a business owner making money. No different to employees who work hard to earn good money.

We need a strong economy now – not in 8 years.

I’d love nothing more than for power prices to drop by 20% to 30% to start with.

I know Queensland can do it overnight if the Queensland Government didn’t take a dividend from the power companies that are owned by the state government.

The only way we’ll save businesses and jobs in this country is if we bring down power prices immediately. This will go a long way in saving and creating Australian jobs.

It’s time we demand cheaper power prices from our State and Federal Governments.

Pauline Hanson sinks Turnbull’s company tax plan

Joe Kelly – The Australian

Pauline Hanson has dealt what appears to be a fatal blow to the government’s company tax cuts by withdrawing support for the package and producing a list of near impossible demands, declaring that Malcolm Turnbull has failed to sell the reform’s benefits.

The One Nation leader, who controls three Senate seats, cited her disappointment with the government’s strategy on debt ­reduction, warning the budget was built on “eggshells” and could “crash at any time” while calling out the Coalition’s failure to support coal-fired power to reduce soaring power bills.

The decision forces the Prime Minister back to the drawing board over the key economic ­policy he took to the 2016 double-dissolution election, with Senator Hanson saying she no longer believes the government has been “upfront and honest with me and the public”.

Centre Alliance, which has two upper house seats, yesterday re­affirmed its view that it was not the right time for company tax cuts, with senator Stirling Griff saying he wanted an “iron clad” guarantee from the government that ­essential services would not be cut.

Senator Hanson’s backflip comes ahead of the “Super Saturday” by-elections.

One Nation candidate Matthew Stephen will contest the Queensland seat of Longman, which is held by Labor on a slim margin of 0.8 per cent.

Senator Hanson, who supported the corporate tax package in March, told The Australian she was unconvinced that the slow phase-in of the corporate tax cuts to 2026-27 would stimulate job creation, one of the key reasons she previously backed the package.

“The whole fact is, if they’re ­serious about this, then start doing something about it now … This government is talking about it six or eight years down the track. Well, that’s not good enough,” Senator Hanson said.

“The people in general don’t want it. It has not been well ­received. The government has not been able to sell the package to the people and they haven’t cut through.”

The only way for the government to have a chance of winning back Senator Hanson’s support would be to implement a dramatic overhaul of the Petroleum ­Resource Rent Tax and commit to a new gas pipeline connecting the west and east coasts.

Senator Hanson said yesterday she was disappointed the pilot ­apprenticeship scheme she negotiated with the government in ­return for supporting the corporate tax cuts did not appear in the budget papers.

“My main concern is that we wanted to create jobs, which we did with the apprentice scheme and also to get revenue into the country to pay down debt,” she said.

“Upon reflection, in the budget, the government has done absolutely nothing. I couldn’t see anything there about the thousand-place apprenticeship scheme.”

Tapping into the Coalition’s ­internal war on energy policy, Senator Hanson argued that one of the reasons she was pulling her support was the government’s failure to provide funding for a new coal-fired power station.

“There is nothing in the budget about a coal-fired power station,” she said. “Unless they start reducing energy prices we are going to lose businesses.”

The government has already legislated the first phase of its enterprise tax plan to pass on relief for businesses with a turnover of up to $50 million, but has not ­received support for the second stage of the plan to reduce the corporate rate to 25 per cent for all businesses by 2026-27, which will cost $35.6 billion.

With Labor and the Greens ­opposed to the second stage of the plan, the government needs to win nine of the 11 crossbench votes to pass the package through the parliament — an impossible equation without One Nation on side.

One Nation will stand by the already legislated company tax cuts for companies with a turnover of up to $50m.

Senator Hanson issued a new set of complex demands for the government to regain her support, including the provision of greater assistance for pensioners, lower power prices for consumers and greater efforts to crack down on multinational tax avoidance. One Nation’s demands also include an overhaul of the PRRT, the introduction of a “use it or lose it policy” for gas reserves off the West Australian coast and the new gas pipeline from the west to the east coast.

“There has to be a decent PRRT,” she said. “We need a pipeline from the west coast to the east coast. Unless we get electricity prices down in this country, we are going to see the closure of a lot of businesses.”

The Australian can reveal the full details of the now-defunct ­secret deal One Nation struck with the government in March to support the company tax cuts, which went well beyond the introduction of the 1000-place apprenticeship pilot scheme.

In a bid to address the GST shortfall for Western Australia, “floating LNG plants” would be forced to supply 15 per cent of their gas to the state under its domestic gas reservation policy or pay the equivalent to the state as a form of royalty. Under the defunct agreement, the government had also agreed to apply a “use it or lose it” policy off the WA coast in a shake-up to the retention lease system, which allows LNG companies to sit on reserves that could be developed sooner by rival companies.

Retention leases are up for renewal every five years and provide security of title for resources that are likely to become commercially viable within 15 years.

The shake-up would have ­allowed leases to be renewed only if companies moved into development within a year, otherwise they would be returned to the market to drive greater competition.

Senator Hanson had also ­negotiated a tightening of tax ­deductions under the PRRT for exploration costs which major companies can bring forward to offset against future income — a move that would have returned $6bn over the forward estimates to the government’s coffers. The PRRT allows exploration costs as a deduction to be taken forward at an “uplift rate” as an ­offset against future income. The uplift factor is the long-term bond rate plus 15 percentage points. Senator Hanson said this had handed several major companies billions of dollars in effective “tax credits”.

Under the deal, One Nation negotiated, the government agreed to reduce the uplift rate to the long-term bond rate plus 5 percentage points. Companies would need to claim the deductions within a 10-year period.

Senator Hanson’s new demands include action to reduce the migration intake, accusing the government of failing to listen to the Australian people. “Even the states are complaining about the immigration numbers, that they can’t provide the infrastructure,” she said.

She also called on the Prime Minister to “get the banks to pay for this royal commission into the banking sector”.

22 replies
  1. Kay Scurr
    Kay Scurr says:

    As usual the Turnbull Govt falling to listen to the people who pay their wages…much gratitude having One Nation, Pauline to block the Coalition form pandering to these big players.

    Reply
  2. ken bauer
    ken bauer says:

    In the 1060 s a plan for 3 dams on the atherton tableand was wiped after tinaroo was built and the other 2 designed to upgrade baron george hydro was scrapped,.
    we would have a bigger hydro working to supply north QLD now not in the dreamtime.
    In the 30s a survey called the burdekin scheme was touted to turn flood waters from the burdekin inland to supply inland farmers.
    Instead we now have a proposed weir on the fitsroy???? when will it happen
    From a 86 year old pensioner who worked all over QLD who had my pension levy i paid stolen by federal gov. and was told my pension was a privelage not a right

    Reply
  3. Kent Bayley
    Kent Bayley says:

    The ultimate expert on common sense is the ‘drovers dog’ and its a timeless reference to common sense in Australia if you value our culture. Pauline speaks from a base of common sense and while I don’t always agree with her, one is never in doubt what she stands for and that’s a welcome change in Australian politics. At the moment the political machine is broken and both Labor and the Coalition are inept and self driven with no concern for tomorrows Australians and they never refer to the wisdom of the drovers dog, mores the pity. The Ranga will do me any day.

    Reply
  4. Paul Kemp
    Paul Kemp says:

    Pauline, as usual, you are correct, the Turncoat ‘government’ governs only in the interests of the foreign banks and multinational companies, they do not care at all for ordinary Australians, whether they live in rural or urban Australia. Our nation has been sold out, by this scum, and its not a matter of “draining the billabong” as you so politely put it, its a matter of pumping out the septic tank, where the largest and most toxic pieces are hiding! We have all heard of the saying, Tweedle Dumb and Tweedle Dumber, well the only ones dumber are the stupid Aussies that keep re-electing this garbage!

    Reply
  5. john mackenzie
    john mackenzie says:

    I. Have voted labor for 50 years, that’s why I will be voting one nation. Labor used to stand behind Australia and it’s people, but sad as it is they have lost their way.

    Reply
    • Elaine Herold
      Elaine Herold says:

      You are so right., I remember my Grandmother saying that Labor was not True Labor anymore. I feel it is time we removed the big 2, ALP & LNP and replaced them with a party who listens to the people and has the welfare of Australia and its people at hear,. Corruption is rife and this country is fast going down.

      Reply
      • Ian Melville
        Ian Melville says:

        Absolutely spot on. I had always voted Labour as my father did before me. They used to look after the every-day worker….now just a mishmash of left wing greenie-pandering rubbish.

        Reply
  6. Jes Jorgensen
    Jes Jorgensen says:

    The big parties have lost contact with the Australian people. Labor listen to
    the unions and Malcolm is still a banker and don’t forget the greens. thy are running around like a chuck without a head. With One Nation we still have a hope for this country not to be taken over by Chinese. I have seen other countries where small parties can change to the better

    Reply
    • Elaine Herold
      Elaine Herold says:

      Hopefully the people of Australia and the voters will will vote carefully in the future as I feel the preferential voting was very confusing to many and resulted in ALP retaining their seat in Queensland. I would prefer to vote informal than have my vote go to a party not of my choice. Note apparently there were 5% informal votes instead of approx. 2% at the last election

      Reply
        • Janice Lees
          Janice Lees says:

          Ian you are so right, preferential voting is killing our “votes”, I only wish there was some way that “a different voting system” could be introduced. ie., 1st past the post wins!

          Reply
  7. John Ward
    John Ward says:

    Respectfully, I’m a little bit perplexed by the current, um sadly elected, Australian Turnbull Governed( as I voted for One Nation in the previous election whilst hoping for the probability that we, the Aussie public would have at the very least shaken up the current government and hoped that this may have been enough to make them realize that it was/is time for a huge change), sadly this was not the case!!
    Now that’s definitely an obvious sign that Turnbull must be voted out at the next election!!
    IE: Please Australia – vote for One Nation with Pauline Hanson at the Helm😉 🇦🇺

    Reply
  8. Robert Buckley
    Robert Buckley says:

    The Australian people are so lucky To have Pauline Hanson fighting for us all, she has sacrificed a lot over the years, been treated badly by the other parties, but still comes out fighting for us all, I’m proud of her, Pauline has held strong in her loyalty for the Australian public.
    What Pauline has pointed out is so important for the interest of this country, after the budget was published and the dust settled she could see the flaws and its weaknesses, it appears that the other parties don’t care about this wonderful country, their fed on personal greed, their not considering other Australian’s, what really has me baffled is they lack any concern for even their own siblings future.
    Again I say thank god we have you Pauline.

    Reply
  9. Stan O'Connor
    Stan O'Connor says:

    Fancy trusting a banker. Have you heard that there is a shortage of workers now in the hospitality industry, It’s no wonder now that the penalty rates have been cut. But now there is an open door for foreigners to come to Australia for 12 months without visors to work in the construction industry and others they might fill the shortage from Europe. That will help the Australian unemployed.
    PS there is no Kerry in my email address.

    Reply
  10. Roger Scott
    Roger Scott says:

    How about some comments on our Israel embassy and a probe into the Downer/Aust/US intel attempted Trump coup – try reading the Conservative Treehouse for background info –

    Reply
  11. Susan Britt
    Susan Britt says:

    Go Pauline you and few others are the only ones acting in the best interests of Australian citizens young and old. The government have ear plugs in and are beyond the understanding of the ordinary people.The government should be cutting immigration which is bringing this country down specifically the type of immigration they are instigating.

    Reply
  12. Greg James
    Greg James says:

    People are disenchanted by politics, it could reasonably be said that it’s been that way for most of time. It’s hard to accept that politicians are now making decisions that have no appreciation for the people. The people are in fact swaying the political parties into decisions best suited for their re-election, hence, politicians are more often making decisions which are not focused on the longer term future, but more focused on our reaction to many things. There is merit in many of the views political parties (regardless of persuasion) have on issues, but then having thrown them out there to find reaction by most of us, they have often withdrawn them because of popular opinion by us – the voter. Let us not forget, opinion polls have the major parties still supported by the greater majority of voters & whilst we have been saying for years that they have lost their way, we the majority, return one of the two major parties to power. Some things will not change. Reasonably, the voter wants as much as they can get, without a lot of thought that everything is not possible without funds (tax revenue). Then we say in disgust – we all pay enough tax to fund all things, but that is not the case.
    Pauline H. has some very good points, they all do at times & I’m sure she will bargain her way to outcomes to better suit the bigger picture. That’s the way it goes & has done for all time. Like all of you, I have gripes with national decisions & think I too know better. A balance of power held by 15% to 30% of the political headcount will largely give us best possible shot, but such outcomes will never please all of us, not ever.

    Reply
  13. John
    John says:

    Why are small business owners paying so much of their business sale in capital gains?
    We have limited ability to pay money into super even though weve had a business for more than 10 years and worked so hard to stay afloat.Super of $50000 is all you can deduct now. Several years ago you were able to deduct 100000 each So much for your retirement !

    Reply
  14. Francine wilson
    Francine wilson says:

    I do not want multinational companies getting tax cuts. Their profit goes offshore and they pay little tax as it is. I work for a French multinational company who made $501 million last year and paid $14 million tax. Their profits go back to the French government via offshore accounts and their employees in Australia struggle to get a fair pay rise. I would be I favour of businesses whose profits are below say $30 million get tax cuts BUT definitely NOT multinationals or companies making more than $30 million. I do not believe big companies who get tax relief will pass this onto their employees. As this has not happened with the penalty rate cuts.

    Reply

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