Senator fast tracks nbn

SENATOR FAST TRACKS NBN | It's December 2018 and after a year of lobbying and pushing it's great to see some of the suburbs with the slowest internet speeds in the country are finally being installed with nbn.Do you have a problem with nbn? Let me know about it with a comment below!#AusPols #OneNation #PeterGeorgiou

Posted by Peter Georgiou - One Nation Senator for Western Australia on Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Georgiou Fast-Tracks NBN for Slowest Internet Suburbs

It’s December 2018 and after a year of lobbying and pushing it’s great to see some of the suburbs with the slowest internet speeds in the country finally being installed with NBN thanks to Senator Peter Georgiou’s relentless push.

Pauline Hanson calls for a Royal Commission into Family Law

PAULINE HANSON CALLS FOR A ROYAL COMMISSION INTO FAMILY LAWYesterday I spoke with Chris Smith on 2GB about my involvement this week with the public hearings into the Federal Circuit and Family Courts of Australia Bill 2018.Before Parliament wrapped up last week, I put forward my strong belief that we must have a Royal Commission into Family Law. I've even gone as far as asking the Prime Minister personally if he will support me.I know there are many people who would get behind my push, so please throw your weight behind the idea and contact the PM's office and ask him to get on board.His office number is (02) 9523 0339. I'm sure he would dearly love to hear from you all for some encouragement.#Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson #ChrisSmith #AlanJonesA

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Family Law Pushing Parents to Suicide

Pauline Hanson spoke with Chris Smith on 2GB about her involvement this week with the public hearings into the Federal Circuit and Family Courts of Australia Bill 2018.

Before Parliament wrapped up last week, One Nation put forward our strong belief that we must have a Royal Commission into Family Law.

We’ve even gone as far as asking the Prime Minister personally if he will support us.

we know there are many people who would get behind our push, so please throw your weight behind the idea and contact the PM’s office and ask him to get on board.

His office number is (02) 9523 0339. we’re sure he would dearly love to hear from you all for some encouragement.

Interview Transcript

Chris:                                         If there’s one issue guaranteed to generate emotion and anger, it’s the family law system. Mention it on air and you’re inundated on both sides. And, because of the emotion, and because children are often involved, it is very difficult to separate fact from fiction. Earlier this year, in a bid to help ease the situation, the Federal Government announced a proposal to combine the Family Court with the Federal Circuit Court. Now, the plan was announced by Attorney General Christian Porter, who said at the time, “This significant structural change is designed to dramatically increase the number of family law matters finalised each and every year, and reduce the backlog of unresolved cases on hand at any one time.” He said, “The purpose of the reform is to ensure Australian families experience shorter waiting times, and a reduction in the potential conflict caused by prolonged and acrimonious family disputes.”

Chris:                                         Now, at the moment, committee hearings on the proposed merger are taking place. So far this week they’ve been in Perth, but the focus now is on the east coast. And attending those hearings is One Nation leader Pauline Hanson. Now, Senator Hanson says while this plan, which had been due to take effect from the 1st of January, by the way, but is now more likely to start in March or April, will help with delays, it’s really just the tip of the iceberg.

Chris:                                         Pauline Hanson wants a Royal Commission into the family law system. She’s called on the government to acknowledge the discriminatory aspects of the family law system contribute to the increase in male suicide rates over Christmas. The terms of reference of her proposed inquiry would include: the conduct of lawyers and the cost of legal advice; the adequacy of legal aid and its budget; the cost of transcripts of court proceedings; the costs, adequacy, and effectiveness of supervised visitation; the conduct and cost of those providing expert advice, including psychologists; the cost and cause of delays; the use of courts at night; the effectiveness and efficiency of the child support system; suicides related to the children’s support and family court systems; and the experience of children.

Chris:                                         Senator Pauline Hanson is on the line right now. Pauline, thank you very much for your time this morning.

Pauline Hanson:                  My pleasure. Thank you, Chris, for having me on.

Chris:                                         How long has this issue been a concern for you, and why?

Pauline Hanson:                  Since 1996, when I first went into Parliament then, it was the biggest issue that came across my desk. And it does with any politician. You said once you bring it up on radio the phone calls come in. No different for politicians. Everyone knows that it’s a huge problem, but they just push it to one side because what can you do about it? It’s too big an issue to deal with.

Chris:                                         It becomes almost too hard for them. Now, I don’t want to intrude on your personal life, but it is relevant. You’re a divorcee. You’ve been through the system yourself. How would you describe your experience?

Pauline Hanson:                  I didn’t have that much of a problem with it, myself personally, but I’ve been through it with two of my sons. And I’m going through it with one of my sons now at the moment, for the past three years. I’ve been very concerned about my sons’ wellbeing, and trying to deal with it through the court system, representing himself. So it’s been extremely difficult for him. I’ve given him the assistance, support, and financial assistance through the trial. It’s extremely hard. I’ve got people pulling me up when I’m doing my shopping. I’m talking to men who are actually at the end of their tether. I’m very concerned about them. It’s absolutely disgusting. Not only that, it’s the children that are lied to by the parents. They’re denied the right to see their parents, either one, the father or the mother. I think that the solicitors and lawyers out there, what they charge their clients, I think it’s disgusting. And it just goes on and on and on.

Chris:                                         This proposal to merge the two courts, I got the impression when I heard this from the minister, that he’s simplifying what is a very complex issue. And when you go through the list of items that you want addressed in a Royal Commission, and I’ve just gone through that in the introduction of the interview, you start to understand how complex it is. There are so many issues that need to be tackled. It’s not just about putting two courts together, is it?

Pauline Hanson:                  No, it’s not. It’s a start. And you’ll find that a lot of the judges are actually agreeing with it to streamline. And the barrister association are actually saying it does need streamlining. We need a one stop pathway for it to actually submit their paperwork to it. But it’s just not that. What they’re trying to do is get rid of the family law court. So there won’t be any more family judges after the last one finishes up at the age of 17, about 2038, ’39. So, therefore, they’re going to bring all of those family law court judges out of the Federal Circuit Court. The Federal Circuit Court judges don’t only handle family law. They handle all other aspects. A lot of the cases have to do with migration, plus other cases. So they’re not expertise in that area. I’m not taking away from judges. There are some that are. But their workloads. You’ll have some judges that will hear at least 10 cases an hour, just going through it.

Pauline Hanson:                  So, judges need to be alleviated, relieved of some of the mentions and some of the minor details that can be taken up by registrars. So they need to put more registrars on, open up the night court. See, we’ve got a backlog in the family law court of 3,000 cases, and under the Federal Circuit Court, 16,800 backlog cases.

Chris:                                         Wow.

Pauline Hanson:                  You’ve got 12 to 18 months before a case can come before the court system [crosstalk 00:06:15].

Chris:                                         And the longer those things go, Pauline, the more it damages the existing relationship between couples. And then the paradigm of children being caught in the middle of it all. And it just compounds the problem, doesn’t it?

Pauline Hanson:                  It does. And the big problem here also is child support. The child support agency has failed, and it’s not doing its job. And that’s the biggest problem that I hear from people as well. So that needs to be sorted out.

Chris:                                         You also say there are judges in the system with no experience of family law. How can that be?

Pauline Hanson:                  Look, they’ve got a touch of it but they’re not totally experienced. And that’s why they were saying in the evidence that’s been given, ’cause I’m now going around Australia. We’ve been to Perth, Adelaide, Sydney today, Brisbane tomorrow, Townsville on Friday, to hear submissions from people with regards to the family law court, and if this bill is going to work. The thing is that they’re worried about if we’re going to lose that experience. And they’re saying if you’re actually going to get rid of the family law courts, you’re going to lose those experiences. ‘Cause a lot of the barristers and solicitors will not go on to become judges in this area, because their work load is too heavy, too stressful. So we need to look at that. We don’t want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. But we need to get it right if we’re going to make these changes. Now, they’re saying that streamlining is going to help. But, I’m concerned now, are we doing the right thing? So I’m going to proceed with it.

Pauline Hanson:                  I’ve also presented to the Prime Minister, and I said to him personally, “You’ve got to go for a Royal Commission into the family law.”

Chris:                                         What was his reaction?

Pauline Hanson:                  He said, “Let me think about it.” Now, I’ve taken other ideas to the government which they’ve taken up. My pension scheme, putting a pipeline for Townsville, defence contracts. I hope they listen to me with this one, because it’s a big issue, effects too many people. And as you said in your opening statement about my comments, at this time of the year, and on Father’s Day we have a lot of suicides with regards to men who are not seeing their children, to do with family law court matters. Please, and I beg people out there, if you know a father out there who doesn’t see his children, who’s depressed over this time of the year, please invite them to spend Christmas Day with you, because I’m very concerned. I don’t want to see another man, or a female, or a mother, who doesn’t see their children at this special time of the year.

Chris:                                         Do you think that the family law decisions more often than not are still weighted against the man?

Pauline Hanson:                  Yes.

Chris:                                         And this is what you’re getting from and gleaning from those who come to you to talk to you about family law?

Pauline Hanson:                  Yes. What is happening is that a lot of women are using these domestic violence orders against the men to help their cases. The fathers don’t get to see the children. The fathers have been fighting these DVO’s. There are actually a lot of them now, bringing false allegations of sexual abuse, which is untrue. The fathers are up against a lot.

Pauline Hanson:                  And of course the courts have to protect the women. And I understand that, because of the 72 women who have been murdered in this last year. But there’s also a lot more male suicides because of it. So it’s a huge, big problem.

Chris:                                         Don’t we need a process by which you can get two sides together in a room? A conciliation, negotiator process, which does happen from time to time, but not happen enough. Because legal practitioners tell me when I raise this subject on air, on my afternoon programme, they tell me time and time again that these are far more effective at getting down to the nub of the issues between the two sides both in terms of property and custody, and it makes a great deal of sense, and then you steer people away from having to fork out exorbitant legal fees.

Pauline Hanson:                  Correct. I’ve actually been working with different organisations that for the last couple of years has been in Parliament. I presented a plan to the Attorney General last week, and it’s basically this, where you actually work together on a [inaudible] mediation that you come to a decision. Now it can be on property and then it can actually do it in the parenting. So the parents actually have to come to an agreement. So the first one who puts the case forward, say they want to go through this process, the other has 30 days to respond to it before it then goes to the court. [crosstalk]

Chris:                                         And then you relieve the pressure on all those judges and courts, Pauline.

Pauline Hanson:                  That’s the answer. That’s the answer to it. And that’s what I’ve presented to the Attorney General. He’s having a look at it at the moment. So I’m trying to come up with ideas and ways that we can actually get it out of the court system. The actual cost of a trial in the family law is about $110,000. In the Federal Circuit Court it’s about $30,000. These are figures just today. You know that 25,000 cases that comes before the courts. The Western Australia has a totally different system, whereas the state government, the state has a say in the family law court, but the magistrate has unlimited powers. They don’t have that around the rest of the country. Everyone looks at the WA way of doing things as the ideal way of dealing with [crosstalk 00:11:20].

Chris:                                         So we could learn from that system, could we?

Pauline Hanson:                  Yes we can. And that’s why even other solicitors and judges around the country hold up the WA systems. And the judges come down with a decision, they have to, within three months. You’ll find that around the country, a lot of decisions are not handed down sometimes for a year, and at some cases even up to even four years.

Chris:                                         That’s frustrating.

Pauline Hanson:                  Exactly right. That’s why people are fed up with it. So I’m trying. These women out there. Please, being a divorced mum myself. The kids only have one mum, one dad. You may have your differences. You were once together. You’ve made the beautiful child. Please, in the interest of the child and each other, get together. Work out your differences. Allow the parents to see the children.

Chris:                                         Don’t use them to hurt your partner.

Pauline Hanson:                  As pawns, exactly right.

Chris:                                         Good luck. You’re on the right case, because as I said at the very beginning, the phones go hot on this subject. There is too much disfunction in the family law court system, and it’s got to change. Pauline, thank you very much for your time.

Pauline Hanson:                  [inaudible] People need power. People power. Get on the phone to the Prime Minister and tell him you want a Royal Commission.

Chris:                                         You want a Royal Commission, support her campaigning on that score. Good on you, Pauline. Thank you.

Pauline Hanson:                  Thanks, Chris. Bye.

Chris:                                         One Nation leader Pauline Hanson.

Bleeding heart Senate sells Australias out!

I'm sorry to have to tell you but yesterday the Senate sold you out.Thanks to the Greens, Derryn Hinch, Centre Alliance (Xenophon), Tim Storer and Labor a bill was passed that will, weaken our border security and open the flood gates to illegal boat people again.And disgustingly they tried to team up, shut down debate and just ram it through.I was given just 5 minutes to speak out against them.This is what I had to say.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Thursday, December 6, 2018

Senate Sells Out Australia for People Smugglers

I’m sorry to have to tell you but yesterday the Senate sold you out.

Thanks to the Greens, Derryn Hinch, Centre Alliance (Xenophon), Tim Storer and Labor a bill was passed that will, weaken our border security and open the flood gates to illegal boat people again.

And disgustingly they tried to team up, shut down debate and just ram it through.

I was given just 5 minutes to speak out against them.

This is what I had to say.

The Government holds Parliament in contempt with trade deal secrecy

Today I forced the Government to explain why it ignored the requirement to consult with the Senate in advance of signing the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP-11 on the 8th of March 2018.Despite what the Government wants you to think the facts are not in dispute. The government did not table the TPP-11, in advance of signing it. The government holds the Senate, in contempt, by not complying with Senate rules which require these types of documents to be tabled at least 14 days before signing.You can watch my full response to the Government or read the full transcript here: https://www.senatorhanson.com.au/2018/12/05/the-government-holds-parliament-in-contempt-with-trade-deal-secrecy/

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Pauline Hanson Exposes Government Trying To Hide Its Dirty Free Trade Deal

On Wednesday Pauline Hanson forced the Government to explain why it ignored the requirement to consult with the Senate in advance of signing the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP-11 on the 8th of March 2018.

Despite what the Government wants you to think the facts are not in dispute. The government did not table the TPP-11, in advance of signing it. The government holds the Senate, in contempt, by not complying with Senate rules which require these types of documents to be tabled at least 14 days before signing.

You can watch the video of Senator Hanson’s speech or read the full response here:

Read more

Pauline Hanson says Liddell Power Station Must Stay

COAL FIRED POWER MUST STAY!At a time when power outages are being forecasted due to insufficient dispatchable power in some states this summer, the NSW Liddell Power Station is set for closure by 2022.I'm sorry, but renewable energy doesn't supply our nation with the necessary power requirements and until it does, I'm sticking with coal-fired power stations.#Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson #Liddell #CoalFiredPowerStations #ILoveCoal #ThatIsSteamNotPoisonousGas

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Forecast: Renewable Energy to Cause Summer Blackouts

At a time when power outages are being forecasted due to insufficient dispatchable power in some states this summer, the NSW Liddell Power Station is set for closure by 2022.

I’m sorry, but renewable energy doesn’t supply our nation with the necessary power requirements and until it does, I’m sticking with coal-fired power stations.

I’ve got nothing against renewables but there is 1600 coal-fired power stations being built across the world. Why can’t we use the coal, that we’re happy to sell overseas, here?

Bill Shorten’s plan to become Prime Minister is to give up to 100,000 people a $2,000 subsidy to put solar batteries on their homes and increase the renewable energy target to 50%.

Fair go Bill, we know the Tesla Powerwall cost around $8000 to $10,000 plus installation.

What about the other 8.9 million private dwellings in the country?

Who came up with this shrewd idea Bill?

It’s very deceitful and will continue to drive up electricity prices for ordinary households, businesses and manufacturing.

ALP’s $2000 handout in home battery plan

From Simon BensonThe Australian

A Shorten government would subsidise batteries for 100,000 homes — paying $2000 to eligible families — and set a goal of installing them in a million households within six years as a means of reaching its 50 per cent renewable energy target by 2030.

The renewables target will be locked in as the centrepiece of Labor’s energy policy agenda along with a 45 per cent emissions reduction target on 2005 levels.

In a move that will invite ­comparisons with the Rudd government’s disastrous taxpayer-funded insulation program during the global financial crisis, Bill Shorten has promised to make the $2000 payment to every family earning less than $180,000 a year to install a battery in their homes.

The Opposition Leader will claim that a $10 million training fund would be established so only accredited battery installers were able to take part in the scheme.

Launching Labor’s major ­energy policy today, Mr Shorten will also vow to implement the ­Coalition’s abandoned national energy guarantee if it can secure bipartisan support in the next parliament but will not legislate the emissions target, which goes beyond the Paris accord.

The move to increase subsidies to renewable energy projects, following the Coalition’s dumping of the renewable energy target, will include a scheme for renters, including solar gardens on rooftops of buildings, and community wind farms. The total cost of the household renewables program, including the battery installation rebate, will be $215.9m over the four-year forward estimates.

 

However, Mr Shorten has flagged further heavy-industry subsidies for renewables which he has yet to put a price tag on but are expected to cost several billion dollars over the medium term. In releasing the opposition’s much-anticipated energy policy Mr Shorten has laid down an unambiguous point of difference with the Coalition. Labor’s plan to “underwrite” renewable energy and storage is in contrast to the Coalition plan to underwrite the construction of new “clean-coal” and gas projects.

Mr Shorten will confirm that the 50 per cent renewable energy target and 45 per cent reduction in emissions compared with 2005 levels — both with a 2030 timetable — are now locked in as election commitments.

“A Labor government I lead will be prepared to directly underwrite and invest in cleaner, ­cheaper power for Australia,” Mr Shorten will say. “We will prioritise renewables and support firming technologies like storage and gas. Labor will invest in new generation, in better transmission and distribution — because we ­realise this vital ­nation-building work cannot be left up to the big power companies.”

Mr Shorten will challenge the Morrison government to resurrect the NEG, which was dumped as Coalition policy following a minority revolt within the Coalition partyroom in the week before Malcolm Turnbull was forced to step down as prime minister. “I repeat Labor’s offer of ­bipartisanship, we are prepared to keep the national energy guarantee on the table,” Mr Shorten will say in his keynote Bloomberg address in Sydney.

“The parliament could debate and vote on this before Christmas, if the Liberals were so inclined. And if I am elected as prime minister, I will sit down with the new opposition leader and the crossbench to talk about a way we can move forward with this framework.”

He will say if the NEG can’t be resurrected, Labor will push ahead with a separate plan.

Elements of the energy policy released ahead of today’s speech detailed the battery and community renewable plan that would allow for low-cost loans for households to invest further in battery storage.

Mr Shorten will claim that battery storage will save households who take up the offer almost 60 per cent on their current energy bills.

Energy Minister Angus Taylor dismissed Labor’s policy this morning and said batteries would not have the power to keep businesses like steel mills and abattoirs running.

“The real problem with this is, even if they install those batteries, it doesn’t touch the sides. It’s not even close to enough,” he told 2GB.

“If we want to keep jobs in this country, if we want to keep manufacturing, if we want to be a country that keeps making things, you have to have an electricity system that’s affordable but can provide that reliable power.”

Minerals Council of Australia chief executive Tania Constable said Labor’s focus on renewables did not yet answer how they would make up for the power generation lost by the closing of coal-fired power stations.

“The challenge for Labor and others proposing rapid increases in renewable energy is to explain how this will occur in just over a decade while ensuring reliable, low-cost, 24/7 baseload energy supply for Australian homes and businesses,” she said.

“With Liddell power station closing in 2022, MCA has identified four additional power stations which could also close: Yallourn in Victoria, Vales Point in NSW, Gladstone C in Queensland and Torrens B in SA. This will reduce low-cost baseload power generation in NSW (by 25 per cent), Victoria (22 per cent), SA (22 per cent) and Queensland (15 per cent).

“It is crucial that Labor consult widely with Australian industry to ensure the real-world impact of its policy proposals is fully understood.”

Anticipating comparisons with the Rudd government $2.7 billion home insulation scheme, Labor sources said the battery-installation program would be constructed under vastly different structures.

Labor’s 2009 roof insulation scheme was condemned by a royal commission after shoddy installations sparked hundreds of house fires and led to the deaths of four people.

The battery program would require people to buy only battery systems approved by the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission and installed only by the highest certified installers. The government would have no role in supply or installation.

The scheme would begin in January 2020, provide for a rebate of $500 per kilowatt hour of battery capacity, and be capped at $2000 for households earning less than $180,000 in gross annual income.

Mr Shorten said this would support up to 100,000 battery installations and triple the number operating in Australia. The policy claims this would benefit all electricity users by cutting peak demand and lowering prices overall.

Low-cost loans through the Clean Energy Finance Council would be available to households wanting to purchase more expensive battery systems. Conditions on the scheme include a requirement that the battery systems be virtual power-plant capable and limited to one per home.

Additional reporting: Richard Ferguson

PNG Foreign Aid Insanity

Over the weekend, the Australian Government pledged to join in on giving PNG $2 billion of your money.Don't worry about the $550 billion (plus) of debt we owe or the hundreds of millions we already give to a notoriously corrupt PNG Government who buy Maserati's and Bentleys.Australia, the US, Japan and New Zealand signed a joint pledge to help PNG supply electricity to 70 percent of its citizens by 2030.Australia will initially contribute $25 million to the project and is expected to provide more support from a $2 billion Pacific infrastructure fund once the total cost of the project is finalised.Keep working Australia - you're not only helping to pay back the debt of failed Governments here in our country but others across the globe too.We're the only ones with the guts to say what you're thinking.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party on Monday, November 19, 2018

Government Gives Another $2 Billion to PNG Instead of Australians

Over the weekend, the Australian Government pledged to join in on giving PNG $2 billion of your money.

Don’t worry about the $550 billion (plus) of debt we owe or the hundreds of millions we already give to a notoriously corrupt PNG Government who buy Maserati’s and Bentleys.

Australia, the US, Japan and New Zealand signed a joint pledge to help PNG supply electricity to 70 percent of its citizens by 2030.

Australia will initially contribute $25 million to the project and is expected to provide more support from a $2 billion Pacific infrastructure fund once the total cost of the project is finalised.

Keep working Australia – you’re not only helping to pay back the debt of failed Governments here in our country but others across the globe too.

We’re the only ones with the guts to say what you’re thinking.

WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT | BOURKE ST KNIFE ATTACK

***WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT***What the hell is happening on the streets of Melbourne?A horrific attack has just occurred in Bourke St and police are asking people to stay away from the Melbourne CBD.As you can see incredible bravery has been shown by bystanders and police.It has been reported that three people were stabbed, one victim has died and the attacker, who has been shot, is in custody.I will have more to say on this once more information becomes publicly available.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Thursday, November 8, 2018

Government Weak On Terrorist Action

In light of the most recent radical Islamic inspired terror attack in Australia, I asked the Government when will they stop migration from known extremists countries?

Their response was possibly the weakest, most gutless answer you could ever imagine.

Gutless government will not discriminate against known extremist countries

In light of the most recent radical Islamic inspired terror attack in Australia, I asked the Government when will they stop migration from known extremists countries?Their response was possibly the weakest, most gutless answer you could ever imagine.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Sunday, November 11, 2018

If we cannot acknowledge the problem Australia has with radical Islamic terrorism then the problem can never be solved and no one should ever be expected to apologise for speaking honestly about the problem.

We also need to acknowledge the problem Islam has with radicalisation of members of its religion.

Instead of making apologies we need to start placing travel bans on countries that are determined to present a threat to Australia’s interests and when the law permits it we need to start deporting those we determine to do us harm.

We also need to look at reforming the rules for citizenship to make sure that new citizens are required to retain dual citizenship for a set period of time so that if it is determined they are a danger to our way of life they can be sent back to where they came from.

No one should apologise for calling out radical Islamic terror

If we cannot acknowledge the problem Australia has with radical Islamic terrorism then the problem can never be solved and no one should ever be expected to apologise for speaking honestly about the problem.We also need to acknowledge the problem Islam has with radicalisation of members of its religion.Instead of making apologies we need to start placing travel bans on countries that are determined to present a threat to Australia's interests and when the law permits it we need to start deporting those we determine to do us harm.We also need to look at reforming the rules for citizenship to make sure that new citizens are required to retain dual citizenship for a set period of time so that if it is determined they are a danger to our way of life they can be sent back to where they came from.You can find One Nation's policy on these issues here: https://www.onenation.org.au/policies/radical-islamic-terrorism/

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Sunday, November 11, 2018

You can find One Nation’s policy on these issues here:

The number of foreign workers in Australia will shock you

As an Australian nationalist, I make no apologies for being strong onjobs for Australians first, and that definitely includes apprenticeships. Labor and the Coalition, on the other hand, have quite literally opened the floodgates to foreign workers on visa schemes that have sold out the unemployed and the under-unemployed right across this country.ACTU Secretary Sally McManus said in July this year that there are 1.4 million visa holders with working rights in Australia. That's disgusting. I have no doubt that these people are hard workers, but the pointof my disgust comes down to Australians wanting a job. They have to compete with over one million overseas workers. Both Labor and the Coalition have hoodwinked voters in this country.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Labor & Coalition Open Floodgates to Foreign Workers on Visa Schemes

As an Australian nationalist, I make no apologies for being strong on
jobs for Australians first, and that definitely includes apprenticeships. Labor and the Coalition, on the other hand, have quite literally opened the floodgates to foreign workers on visa schemes that have sold out the unemployed and the under-unemployed right across this country.

ACTU Secretary Sally McManus said in July this year that there are 1.4 million visa holders with working rights in Australia. That’s disgusting. I have no doubt that these people are hard workers, but the point
of my disgust comes down to Australians wanting a job. They have to compete with over one million overseas workers.

Both Labor and the Coalition have hoodwinked voters in this country.

One Nation thanked for their "principled position" on Free Trade Agreements

I have to say I was shocked the other day when I received a positive letter from the head of one of Australia’s biggest unions thanking myself and One Nation for our principled stand voting against the unfair Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal.And didn’t I let the Labor party know it when they tried to trundle out their tired old lies about penalty rates even though everyone knows One Nation has voted with Labor to restore penalty rates for workers. The TPP is bad for Australian workers, you know It, I know it and the unions know it. Labor sold out its voters and sold out the members of the unions who fund them and for what? So that thousands of workers from countries like Mexico and Brazil are allowed to flood the country.So much for standing up for Aussie workers and Aussie jobs.

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Adam Giles questions Pauline Hanson on her views on Aboriginals

Yesterday afternoon, former NT Chief Minister Adam Giles asked Pauline Hanson "What is her policy and views on indigenous Australians".You be the judge if her views are racist.#Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson #AdamGiles #SkyNews #Australia #Aboriginal #Views #HaveYourSay

Posted by Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party on Sunday, November 4, 2018

Pauline Lays Out Indigenous Policy, Racist?

Former NT Chief Minister Adam Giles asked Pauline Hanson “What is her policy and views on indigenous Australians”.

You be the judge if her views are racist.

Pauline Hanson asks "Where is the drought relief money?"

I’ve been out in Roma for the last two days speaking with farmers, businesses, the council, and tourism operators from across the western parts of the state.The question on peoples lips is, “Where is the drought relief money” and “why is it so difficult for these genuine cases to get their hands on it”?There are two stories I heard today that I’d like to share. They’re extremely upsetting, but they’re real.Our politicians and the Australian public must know that the money is not reaching the people who need it during these desperate times. The Government and those tasked with the job need to lift their game because this is terrible!Call my office if you need assistance and my staff and I will do our best to get you the help you need. (07) 3221 7644#PaulineHanson #OneNation #DroughtRelief #Donations #NoMoneyReachingTheNeedy #SuicidePrevention

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Friday, November 2, 2018

Farmers Suiciding – Where Is The Drought Money?

I’ve been out in Roma for the last two days speaking with farmers, businesses, the council, and tourism operators from across the western parts of the state.

The question on peoples lips is, “Where is the drought relief money” and “why is it so difficult for these genuine cases to get their hands on it”?

There are two stories I heard today that I’d like to share. They’re extremely upsetting, but they’re real.

Our politicians and the Australian public must know that the money is not reaching the people who need it during these desperate times.

The Government and those tasked with the job need to lift their game because this is terrible!

Call my office if you need assistance and my staff and I will do our best to get you the help you need. (07) 3221 7644.