How water infrastructure can save the Murray-Darling Basin

There are two issues causing the majority of the problems we see with the Murray-Darling Basin, mismanagement and a lack of infrastructure.While Labor and Green politicians are saying we need to take more water out of the river system and flush it out to sea, One Nation is saying we need to build the infrastructure we need to make sure we have enough water for everyone.Let’s build the dams and other infrastructure we need to capture the water where it is abundant and see that it goes to the places that need it! You can read more about One Nation’s plan to protect Australians from droughts while helping keep our farmers and waterways prosperous and healthy here: www.onenation.org.au/policies/water-security/

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Monday, January 28, 2019

Pauline Hanson Calls for Construction of Bradfield and Ord Schemes to Drought Proof Inland Australia

Video Transcript:

Paul Murray:                         Let’s finish off here with the very serious situation of what’s happening in the Murray-Darling, where yet again another example of the huge collection of fish that have died. Now again, this is one of those touch points where if you spend three hours talking about it you can’t get across all elements of this issue. But in and of itself, again, the Greenies believe that it is anyone who uses water to take care of their properties, to make sure that they can have any form of produce that is ruining the rivers, whereas, the minister responsible for regional water, Niall Blair in New South Wales, well, he makes a fairly good point which is, it’s difficult to flush through river systems when no rain is falling at all.

Niall Blair:                               There’s nothing that anyone has been able to point to, no scientists, no locals. No one has been able to point to anything else that could prevent something like this other than fresh water coming into the system, and we just don’t have that, and unfortunately with the weather conditions, the hot weather, and then the sudden drop in temperature, and the rain overnight, we’ve seen another fish kill today.

Paul Murray:                         Now, Janine, I’m not pretending that what is happening isn’t terrible. It’s a terrible thing to see, but it does make fairly obvious logic here that for water management, you need more of it falling from the sky.

Janine Perrett:                     Yes, I agree with that, but the word you said was management, it wasn’t just relying on God. There is management of this water system, and the question is, has there been mismanagement? Yes, you need water, but have they taken too much out? I don’t know, and I’m like maybe Pauline and some others who don’t want to believe the scientists. I’m happy to let the scientists from all sides get together. What I would love in this, is for once, this is a bipartisan issue. For goodness sake, can’t … Forget the Greens, because they’re out there. Why can’t Labour and Liberals get together, agree on a report, and at least say, it’s going to be somebody else’s problem on it? There has to be. We tried to do it with the Murray-Darling. It might prove to be simply a drought issue, but we need both sides to agree to look at it properly.

Paul Murray:                         Well, Pauline, why do you think this is happening?

Pauline Hanson:                  All right. You haven’t got enough water flowing through the system. What I’ve been pushing for is the Bradfield Scheme that comes from North Queensland, the Herbert, Tully, and the Burdekin Rivers, to actually direct it inland. Flood inland Queensland, flow down to the Murray-Darling, and run it through. What they’ve done, and I’ve been on three-day tour from bus from Victoria through New South Wales, to the mouth of the Murray-Darling, it has been mismanaged terribly, they’ve actually sold off the water. You’ve got international interests that are owning the water.

Janine Perrett:                     Yes.

Pauline Hanson:                  You’ve got an organisation, the Murray-Darling Management, has gone from 10 people up to over 300 people managing that. They’ve had the wetlands that they closed down in South Australia. There’s so much I can tell you about it. The wrong decisions that they’ve made. The Bradfield Scheme was priced. The last price they had was $9 billion, put that in, build the Bradfield Scheme. Water inland Queensland. Bring it from the Ord, water inland, Australia from the Ord Scheme as well, and bring water inland and flush out our river systems. That’s it. That’s what I’d be doing.

Paul Murray:                         It’s interesting though, Richo, where as important as this issue is, I can feel a certain eye glaze that kicks over because we’ve heard debates in and around Murray-Darling for a bloody long time here. People like Tony Burke, even Malcolm Turnbull at one point in time have all had some form of involvement in all of this. Just on the specifics though, of what the New South Wales Minister’s saying, how credible is it to say, I think correctly, but what do you think? If it doesn’t rain, it’s hard to move water around?

Graham R.:                             I agree. I don’t think there’s any magic wand you can wave over this, or silver bullet, or whatever, I just don’t think that that exists. I think the only solution is rain, and we’re just not getting any of that. It’s a terrible thing to watch, and I wish there was a fix, but I’ve not read of, or heard of a proper fix, so I’ll-

Janine Perrett:                     Well, at least Pauline’s got an idea. We’ve got floods up in North Queensland, instead of wasting $10 billion on an inland rail, boondoggle, perhaps we could have an inland irrigation system.

Graham R.:                             Turning rivers back the other way, is not as easy as it sounds.

Paul Murray:                         The Field … Bradfield, I think-

Janine Perrett:                     Would cost money.

Paul Murray:                         ..that the Bradfield Scheme’s not going-

Rowan:                                     But if Pauline’s-

Graham R.:                             That might be viable.

Rowan:                                     Pauline’s solution is putting forward … you’re using man’s ingenuity-

Janine Perrett:                     Exactly.

Rowan:                                     -to put more water into the river, rather than having, which the Greens and Labour, and the liberals unfortunately, are just trying to shuffle around the money, the water will be there. Can I just very quickly say, that I think the problem is the number of avocado farms to feed a lot the smashed avocado pate’s in the inner-city Green’s electorate, so …

Paul Murray:                         Well, if that’s Aussie produce I’m more than happy.

Pauline, thank you very much, along with Richo, Rowan and Janine. I’m looking forward to it again next week.

3 replies
  1. Glynis Robinson
    Glynis Robinson says:

    IT ALWAYS RAINS UP NORTH OF OUR COUNTRY DURING THE WET. If O’Connor can build a water pipeline in WA back in 1904 -1910 with manual labour and wheelbarrows to supply water from Perth to Kalgoorlie. which was a success. and I might add, is till working 100+ years later. Then with today’s modern equipment we should be able to water the entire centre of Australian States from the wet season rains in top end WA, NT, and Qld. At the moment the excessive water is let out of dams which flood towns and this fresh water runs out into the oceans. Vote for Pauline and maybe this will happen.

    Reply
  2. Lance Barton
    Lance Barton says:

    Pauline has it completely correct. Redirect that water from Northern Australia to the south. The capital cost will quickly be offset by the increased production of the inland and no need for government hand-outs (such as they are!).

    Reply
  3. Roger Duncan
    Roger Duncan says:

    Pauline is spot on! I moved to Australia 30 years ago. I spotted via the news outlets, the senseless waste of Northern waters flowing into the ocean back then. When politicians got involved, it got worse with Chinese farmers receiving unlimited water for their cotton plantations. Who got paid off for that? To have our coastal towns under water on a regular basis while our farmers are in life choking drought is ridiculous! I have long advocated solar powered pipelines to top up our dams along the East coast and eventually, spilling into the Murray river. Bout time politicians got off their asses and start taking care of our farmers and growers. Without them, we will be importing all of our produce, meat and milk while our precious water supply runs off into the ocean. How stupid is that? Give ’em hell Pauline!! Maybe there are still a few in parliament who have some semblance of your common sense and foresight!

    Reply

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