Pauline Hanson calls for a Cane Toad Cull

Last week I wrote to the Prime Minister suggesting a cane toad cull with the help of the public. There are over 200 million of these vermin cane toads across the country.Since their misguided introduction to deal with cane beetle in the North Queensland town of Gordonvale in 1935, cane toad numbers have exploded beyond the borders of Queensland and are having an enormous effect on native Australian species.Unlike native frogs that lay between 1,000 and 2,000 eggs during their breeding cycle, toads will lay between 8,000 and 35,000.Their poisonous toxin is deadly to many native species including lizards, quolls, dingoes and crocodiles. Adult cane toads will eat almost anything it can fit in its mouth, including dead animals and pet food scraps. Their appetite knows no boundaries.While I recognise the federal governments $2 million dollar research into cane toads in 2008, it is clear to most Australians, no solution was found to eradicate their existence.When rabbits plagued our nation, a sizeable reward was posted for the biological control of the species. Other invasive species such as European carp have been eradicated from waterways using biological measures and I believe it is time our Federal Parliament takes a swift, bipartisan approach into the eradication of this pest species.I have encouraged the Prime Minister to introduce a 3 month bounty over the Summer months to help reduce the breeding numbers throughout Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.A 10 cent reward for the collection of each cane toad, I believe would encourage most Australians living with the pest to take an active roll in reducing their numbers until a biological measure is developed.#Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson #CaneToads #Queensland #Pest

Posted by Pauline Hanson's Please Explain on Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Pauline Hanson Calls to Exterminate Cane Toads

Last week I wrote to the Prime Minister suggesting a cane toad cull with the help of the public.

There are over 200 million of these vermin cane toads across the country.

Since their misguided introduction to deal with cane beetle in the North Queensland town of Gordonvale in 1935, cane toad numbers have exploded beyond the borders of Queensland and are having an enormous effect on native Australian species.

Unlike native frogs that lay between 1,000 and 2,000 eggs during their breeding cycle, toads will lay between 8,000 and 35,000.

Their poisonous toxin is deadly to many native species including lizards, quolls, dingoes and crocodiles. Adult cane toads will eat almost anything it can fit in its mouth, including dead animals and pet food scraps. Their appetite knows no boundaries.

While I recognise the federal governments $2 million dollar research into cane toads in 2008, it is clear to most Australians, no solution was found to eradicate their existence.

When rabbits plagued our nation, a sizeable reward was posted for the biological control of the species. Other invasive species such as European carp have been eradicated from waterways using biological measures and I believe it is time our Federal Parliament takes a swift, bipartisan approach into the eradication of this pest species.

I have encouraged the Prime Minister to introduce a 3 month bounty over the Summer months to help reduce the breeding numbers throughout Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.

A 10 cent reward for the collection of each cane toad, I believe would encourage most Australians living with the pest to take an active role in reducing their numbers until a biological measure is developed.

Here’s my letter to the Prime Minister:

4 replies
  1. John Klasen
    John Klasen says:

    Years ago I had friend that worked at the Lucas Heights atomic energy Commission and he put forward a proposal to eradicate the cattle tick by starting a breeding programs and irradiating them to sterilize them then letting them go into the general population to breed them out. How ever it was never implemented as the chemical companies greased enough palms to have that stopped there was far too much money at stake in their chemicals for cattle dips etc. However the same method could be employed with the cane toads if enough political will was employed and enough money put in to carry it out, it would take some years no doubt to implement but it’s either that or put up with cane toads for ever more to the detriment of our wild life that is already being decimated by them.

    Reply
  2. suzy hong
    suzy hong says:

    yes, we need to cull cane toads, also kangaroos where they are taking over rural land and eating the crops. We have come to the point where the natural circle of life needs a little assistance. Crocodiles, sharks, cane toads, the cuckoo birds taking over other birds nests, just to name a few that are having devastating effects on our beautiful country. Australia as a country just wants to live a peaceful, how ya goin’ lifestyle without the influence of the outside world destroying the beauty and rough country we know and love.

    Reply
  3. Paul Gray
    Paul Gray says:

    I agree with everything you’re said Pauline. You’ve come a long way since your rough beginnings in Politics and the maturity is showing.
    Climate change is such a scary subject to many people and that’s why the major political parties tread cautiously.

    Reply
  4. Ingrid Hall
    Ingrid Hall says:

    I think it is a great idea Pauline, however you would have to catch 10 toads just to make $1. That probably would not even pay for petrol money to get them to are place where they can be exterminated. 50c to a $1 is far more inviting and would encourage some who are doing it hard to catch toads as a full time occupation that can be taxed. That might interest Parliament more if they stand to get some of that money back through tax’s. Lets face it, it is going to cost Government heaps no matter what they do to try and get rid of those pests. While not create some jobs while we are at it.

    Reply

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